Mitcham Kiach

Jerusalem construction is reaching new heights. Projects like the business district are pushing the limits of the architectural definition of the city, and formerly low-rise neighborhoods are expanding skyward. As part of the municipality’s unprecedented plan to change the vertical character of the city, Pei, Cobb, Freed and Partners have revealed their vision for Mitcham Kiach.

Located adjacent to Mahane Yehuda, Mitcham Kiach will occupy the site of the historic Kiach school building. The property, which is currently used as a parking lot, will be open to the public, allowing for freedom of movement and easier access to vital shopping streets. The former school building will be converted into a boutique hotel and two 26-storey residential towers will round out the space.

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The project is part of strategy to gentrify and increase the population of the area and will complement the J-Tower and Mitcham Etz Chaim, another project of Pei, Cobb, Freed and Partners.

Mitcham Kiach

6 thoughts on “Mitcham Kiach

  1. Wagner says:

    They shouldn’t build tall towers in this region of Jerusalem, it doesn’t fit the skyline and its character as an important historical city. They should limit these tall towers to 7 floors, and substitute most of the glass with jerusalem stone, it would become perfect that way.

  2. a Jerusalemite says:

    I totally agree with WAGNER. There is a building which almost completed opposite the Clal building which looks nice and its highest floor is more or less at the height of Clal. That’s it, they shouldn’t build taller than that. It’ll be terrible. They have to take into account the low rise Nahlaot across the street and the whole character of this area which is not and should not be that of tall buildings.

  3. jude says:

    I disagree and believe the higher the better and its time to move on from the old stone we live in 2017
    We dont live in a museum and if we were realy that traditional we should also all still be wearing white robes…
    Time to move on no?

    1. Droft says:

      No, it’s just to preserve one of the few and most important old cities left almost intact on earth. Imagine if they destroyed all the old buildings of Florence, Veneza, Prague, etc just to build skyscapers, that would destroy what make those cities so unique, wouldn’t?
      That’s why there is Tel Aviv, there there isn’t any problem in building tall skyscrapers, and also thousands of other cities on the planet where there is tall skyscapers, the world isn’t stuck in a museum, if you like those cities you can live in any of them, but historical preserved cities there are really few, that’s why they are so important for the World, including Jerusalem

    2. Wagner says:

      No, it’s just to preserve one of the few and most important old cities left almost intact on earth. Imagine if they destroyed all the old buildings of Florence, Veneza, Prague, etc just to build skyscapers, that would destroy what make those cities so unique, wouldn’t?
      That’s why there is Tel Aviv, there there isn’t any problem in building tall skyscrapers, and also thousands of other cities on the planet where there is tall skyscapers, the world isn’t stuck in a museum, if you like those cities you can live in any of them, but historical preserved cities there are really few, that’s why they are so important for the World, including Jerusalem

  4. Shimon Elstein says:

    Two 26 storey residential towers with underground parking???
    How are all those cars going to get to and from the buildings?
    As usual, Jerusalem runs ahead with building without considering road infrastructure.
    Just like Ramot, Har Hotzvim, Gilo and most everywhere in town. We will have even bigger and better traffic jams to look forward to.

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